Online Activity Study


Thanks to Metroknow for this link to a study about online activity including kids.  Symantec, maker of Norton Security, did the study and here are some highlights from the study of kids activity:

  • Making friends. About a third of U.S. online children ages 8-17 have made friends online (35%). When you look at teens, the percentage increases, with 50% of U.S. teens ages 13-17 reporting they have made friends with people online. One in three U.S. children (33%) report that they prefer to spend time with their online friends the same amount or more than their offline friends.
  • Social networking. Seventy-six percent of U.S. teens ages 13-17 years old “constantly,” “frequently” or “sometimes” visit social networking sites. Globally, about half of boys (51%) and girls (48%) visit social networking sites. Like mother, like daughter and like father, like son! That’s right…kids take after their parents when it comes to social networking. Case in point: 47% of U.S. parents “constantly,” “frequently” or “sometimes” use social networks while 46% of U.S. children report the same. When you look at China, the numbers are 78% of adults and 85% of children.
  • Shopping online. About one in three (35%) U.S. children report being “very confident” or “confident” in shopping online. This number shoots to 69% among children in China.
  • Getting requests for personal information. About 4 in 10 U.S. teens (42%) ages 13-17 have received an online request for personal information.
  • Being approached by strangers. U.S. children report that 16% of them have been approached online by a stranger; however, U.S. adults believe that just 6% of children have been approached online by a stranger.
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    About JoeDuck

    Internet Travel Guy, Father of 2, small town Oregon life. BS Botany from UW Madison Wisconsin, MS Social Sciences from Southern Oregon. Top interests outside of my family's well being are: Internet Technology, Online Travel, Globalization, China, Table Tennis, Real Estate, The Singularity.
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