Hong Kong Travel Tips


Thanks to some advice from Matt at Cutler Investments I’ve started a great list of things to do in Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Beijing.     I’m also reading guidebooks and surfing but it’s always best to talk to experience travelers (or better yet, locals) who can clue you in to the “must see” tourist spots as well as the hidden gems.  

For this first trip to Hong Kong I just had him quickly list for me some of the “don’t miss” stuff and I’m fleshing this in as I go with details as I find more things to see – this is as much for my reference as anything else. 

Stanley Market

Fishing Villages via Ferry, where they’ll fix the fish you choose at a local restaurant.   Aberdeen has many places like this plus the monster brightly lit floating restaurant called ?   The food there is not great but OK.

Star Ferry Hong Kong to Kowloon.   This is the one often cited for great views of the Hong Kong skyline.

Nathan Street Night Market

Double Decker bus.   Take it from Wau Chai sp?  over the mountain.   Get the upstairs front seat for the best dramatic views and experience as it whizzes through traffic and over steep cliffsides.    I think we can get on this near our first hotel, the Island Pacific Hotel, right off the main road that forms a crescent around Victoria Harbor.

Trams:  There is one to Victoria Peak and another I’m not yet clear about.

Lei Yu Mun

Temple Street Market

Top 14 Must-See Sights from Oriental Travel:

Victoria Peak

Ocean Park

Ladies Street

Temple Street

Stanley

Star Ferry

Tsing Ma Bridge

Po Lin Monastery & Tai O

Aberdeen

Mai Po Natural Area

Central District

Happy Valley

360 Ngong Ping  Hong Kong Disneyland

Central District (then to Star Ferry)

Star Ferry Small green and white ferries link Central District on Hong Kong Island with Tsim Shs Tsui. 10 minutes.Aberdeen : Hong Kong Tsai – traditional fishing village. Boat-dwellers in the Aberdeen Bay, shuttling with sampan along the Bay. Jumbo Floating Restaurant and the Tai Bak (Tai Bei) Seafood Boat in Aberdeen Habour. Free travel by ferry boat to the restaurants, then to old Hong Kong Tsai Street and to the Hung Shing (God of the South Seas and weather prophet) Temple at the juncture of the sea lane and the land road, and the Tin Hau Temple

Victoria Peak “funicular” Tram.Double Decker Bus Ride

Ding ding rail tram across north side of Island – sit upstairs.Ngong Ping Cable Car: spectacular 5.7km bi-cable. From Tung Chung, cross Tung Chung Bay, angle station on Airport Island, turning in air towards North Lantau.

The Po Lin temple (Big Buddah! & Tai O fishing village:
On Lantau Island – take the Ngong Ping Cable car?
Temple Street “men’s street bazaar”. Between Yau Ma Tei and Jordan. Men clothing, watches etc. Chinese opera at end of banyan trees. Bustling like a night club. The Tung Choi Street is also known as Ladies Street and has women’s clothing, handbags, etc for sale.

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About JoeDuck

Internet Travel Guy, Father of 2, small town Oregon life. BS Botany from UW Madison Wisconsin, MS Social Sciences from Southern Oregon. Top interests outside of my family's well being are: Internet Technology, Online Travel, Globalization, China, Table Tennis, Real Estate, The Singularity.
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2 Responses to Hong Kong Travel Tips

  1. The restaurant in Aberdeen is Jumbo

    The funicular tram runs to The Peak. The Tram (the “ding ding” in colloquial Cantonese) is a double decker slow rail tram across the north side of HK Island. For HK$2 you can ride from one end of the Island to the other. If you have time (did I say it was slow paced?) sitting upstairs is a cool way to rub shoulders with locals and see the street scenes that would be missed via the subway.

  2. JoeDuck says:

    Fantastic advice – thank you Tom! The ding ding sounds like a fun way to get the scope of things. We’ll be there for 3 days so we should have the time.

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