Google’s reinclusion nightmare


John Honeck has an excellent piece about the challenges with Google’s site reinclusion process, a virtual nightmare of inconsistency and confusion.     I’ve seen the benefits and pitfalls of good and bad Google rankings and indexing at many sites, and “inconsistency” is the only clear pattern.    On the one hand I don’t have enough information to fully “blame” Google for the problems.  They have their hands full deleting junk or deceptive sites created by extremely sophisticated spamming operations around the globe, but as I noted over at John’s blog:

This is an *excellent* set of observations, and with all due respect to my pal Matt I’ve always been totally unmoved by Google’s suggestion that making the reinclusion and webmaster information process more transparent would somehow jeopardize Google’s ability to kill spammers.

In fact from my observations over the years I think the lack of transparency, along with initally vague webmaster guidelines (now fixed), have caused many if not most of the spam problems as both spammers and regular web folks vie to push the limits of the rules while staying in Google’s good graces. The big problem now is the profound inconsistency in the way sites are indexed, and the fact that it’s very difficult for webmasters to get much feedback from Google.  Google would be well advised to consider better automated or customer pays routines to examine websites for problems and allow reinclusion, because the frustration is building more than they realize in the webmaster and small business community.

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About JoeDuck

Internet Travel Guy, Father of 2, small town Oregon life. BS Botany from UW Madison Wisconsin, MS Social Sciences from Southern Oregon. Top interests outside of my family's well being are: Internet Technology, Online Travel, Globalization, China, Table Tennis, Real Estate, The Singularity.
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2 Responses to Google’s reinclusion nightmare

  1. jazar says:

    I agree. My blog site was removed from the search index without any notice. The only reason I can find is that another site was scraping my content without any credit or reference back to my site, and since it was a bigger and more popular site, I think Google may have thought I was the one stealing the content. I contacted the other site owner and got them to remove my content. My site is just a blogger site, nothing fancy and very few outbound links, none paid (except Google Adsense). I also submitted a re-inclusion request to Google about two weeks ago. I have heard nothing. I have no idea what I need to do. If I am doing something that Google doesn’t like, then I would gladly change it. I just need some feedback from them. I have considered starting over and moving my content to a different domain. I know it will take a few months to get my listings and pagerank back to where it was. I don’t know if that will take longer than it will take Google to review my re-inclusion request and reinstate my listings. And even if I do re-establish my rankings under a different site, what might I have in my content that would cause the same problem again.

    I do realize that Google has a massive number of sites and people to deal with. They are actually making tons of money, which makes me happy because I am a shareholder. It seems like they can afford to solve this problem if they want to. Not only do I have websites for them to index, I am an advertising customer, as well as a shareholder. I have no access to anyone at Google who can take a few minutes and give me one sentence of information that could save me months of frustration and aggravation. It couldn’t take more than 30 seconds for someone to fire off an email an let me know my re-inclusion request has been accepted or denied. I really like Google, but I feel like I am walking through a minefield in total darkness.

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