Steve Jobs’ down with DRM campaign could get him elected….


Wow, when Steve Jobs suggested music producers effectively getting rid of Digital Rights Management in his post “Thoughts on Music“, a few people were interested in that. Since blogging may determine the outcome of the coming presidential election, I recommend Jobs run for US President on the “A chicken in every pot and free music in every pod” platform.

 

 

Here, from TechMeme, are some of the people who are talking about it: Technovia, InformationWeek Weblog, down the avenue, A Copyfighter’s Musings, The Tech Report, confused of calcutta, Paul Colligan’s …, The 463, Things That, PaulStamatiou.com, TechBlog, Macsimum News, i-boy, The Last Podcast, The Digital Edge Blog, The Workplace Blog, Rex Hammock’s weblog, Forward Thinking, Seeking Alpha, WeBreakStuff, Business Filter, Change Is Good, Paul Kedrosky’s …, BuzzMachine, The Future of Music …, The Viral Garden, Medialoper, Fast Company Now, Jeremy Toeman’s LIVEdigitally, Blogging Stocks, The Gong Show, DeWitt Clinton, Blackfriars’ Marketing, Listening Post, Geek News Central, SearchViews, rc3.org, A VC, Life On the Wicked Stage, PSFK Trend: PSFK, Buzzworthy, robhyndman.com, Slashdot, Ministry of Tech, Joseph Scott’s Blog, Podcasting News, Paul Thurrott’s Internet Nexus and UNEASYsilence

 

My first reaction is that internet people tend to talk too much about music news, but DRM is a very significant topic both in terms of the impact on the industry in terms of money and innovation and perhaps will have broader influence in the coming debates about who owns what and why. So, squawk on dudes!

Kirkland’s Shareware Coffeehouse. Order what you want, pay whatever you like.


This social and economic cafe experiment by a Seattle Googler is fascinating, especially because it’s actual appears to be working so far to generate enough to keep the business going.  There are no prices and people’s contributions are not monitored.   Thus even the normal social pressure you’d have with, for example, a church collection plate are largely absent here in the Kirkland Cafe.

I’m totally skeptical of this model as a scalable type of business, but it’s sure interesting.   Burning man sensibilities come to mind.